JPB Fellow Sara Wylie’s new book!

From flammable tap water and sick livestock to the recent onset of hundreds of earthquakes in Oklahoma, the impact of fracking in the United States is far-reaching and deeply felt.In Fractivism Sara Ann Wylie traces the history of fracking and the ways scientists and everyday people are coming together to hold accountable an industry that has managed to evade regulation. Read more.

An interdisciplinary collaboration among the fellows.

JPB Fellows Hector Olvera, Allison Appleton, Christina H. Fuller, Annie Belcourt and Co-Director Laura D. Kubzansky recently published a paper about the Integrated Socio-Enviornmental Model (ISEM) of health and well-being in Springer International Publishing’s journal “Current Environmental Health Reports.” Learn more about the publication. 

UTEP Welcomes Harvard Fellows

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) hosted the JPB Environmental Health Fellows’ final workshop from March 12-15, 2018. The three-and-a-half year fellowship was established in 2014 with Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health to promote a new generation of environmental health scholars committed to comprehensive approaches to address health disparities in disadvantaged communities. Read more

Fractivism: Corporate Bodies and Chemical Bonds by Sara Wylie

JPB Fellow Sara Wylies latest book: Fractivism: Corporate Bodies and Chemical Bonds talks about the impact of fracking in the United States. In Fractivism she traces the history of fracking and the ways scientists and everyday people are coming together to hold accountable an industry that has managed to evade regulation. Read more.

The hidden health inequalities that American Indians and Alaskan Natives face

By JPB Fellow Annie Belcourt. I was an American Indian student pursuing a doctoral degree in clinical psychology in the 1990s, when I realized the stark contrast between my life experiences growing up on my home reservation and those of my non-Native peers. Read more.

New NAACP Report Shows Disproportionate Energy Shutoffs Among African Americans in the US

A new report from the NAACP highlights how low-income and Black communities are affected disproportionately from utility companies energy shutoffs relative to the rest of the country. The report uses JPB Fellow Diana Hernandez’s framework of energy justice to support it’s findings. Read more about the report at Color Lines.

JPB Fellow Awarded Outstanding New Environmental Scientist Award

Madeleine Scammell, one of the 2014 – 2017 fellows was recently awarded a prestigious ONES award! Read more about Madeleine and the four other 2017 winners here.

The latest footwear trend: reducing plastic waste

Timberland has partnered with Thread International to bring recycled material to their shoes. This partnership not only reduces plastic waste, but brings stable jobs to Haitian communities.  – GreenBiz

New Fellow Research: Diana Ceballos

In a new study, JPB Environmental Health Fellow Diana Ceballos looks to better understand connections betweek home- and work-related exposures in high-risk communities by identifying occupation-specific of home exposure. Learn more here: https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/cressh/y2-pilot-project-2-of-2/

New study finds wide racial disparity in cervical cancer deaths

“According to the analysis published Monday, the hysterectomy-corrected mortality rates put black American women on par with women living in some underdeveloped countries in Latin America, Asia and Africa, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.” – The New York Times