New Article: Associations of Residential Brownness and Greenness with Fasting Glucose in Young Healthy Adults Living in the Desert

Evolutionary psychology theories propose that contact with green, natural environments may benefit physical health, but little comparable evidence exists for brown, natural environments, such as the desert. In this study, we examined the association between “brownness” and “greenness” with fasting glucose among young residents of El Paso, Texas. We defined brownness as the surface not covered by vegetation or impervious land within Euclidian buffers around participants’ homes. Fasting glucose along…

New Publication: Exposures in nail salons to trace elements in nail polish from impurities or pigment ingredients – A pilot study

Nail polishes have evolved considerably. Toxic elements, such as lead, have been found in nail polish, and it is unclear if new finishes using metallic effect pigments may be contributing to metals exposure in nail technicians. We characterized concentrations of trace elements in 40 nail polishes, 9 technicians’ urine, and 20 technicians’ toenail clippings from 8 nail salons in the Boston area in 2017. We also collected 24 salon surface…

Professor Studies Hazard Exposure and Health Disparities among Workers

Diana Ceballos, assistant professor of environmental health at Boston University, studies the burden of exposure to toxicants in the workplace, community, and home. When the New York Times published a widely read, two-part exposé of labor abuse and poor working conditions at New York City-area nail salons in 2015, Diana Ceballos was part of a team of occupational health experts called upon by the state Department of Health to assess salon working environments and nail technicians’ exposure…

New Article: Climate shock effects and mediation in fisheries

Climate shocks are increasingly disruptive to global food systems, with far-reaching consequences for resource-based communities. Yet quantitative assessments of community impacts rarely account for economic connectivity between alternative resources. We show that patterns of resource use influence the sensitivity of US West Coast fishing communities to unprecedented fishery closures in the wake of a recent climate shock. Patterns of participation in commercial fisheries were significantly altered during the fishery closures,…

Nature Aids in Health and Wellness for Mind, Body and Soul, New Article Finds

Nature has several benefits that impact a person’s overall well-being, according to a new research article, NatureRx@UMD: A Review for Pursuing Green Space as a Health and Wellness Resource for the Body, Mind and Soul. University of Maryand School of Public Health faculty members Dr. Jennifer Roberts (assistant professor, kinesiology) and Dr. Shannon Jette (associate professor, kinesiology) contributed to the American Journal of Health Promotion article, which explores three themes: “Admiration for Nature…

New Article: The Imperative for Research to Promote Health Equity in Indigenous Communities

Health disparities exact a devastating toll upon Indigenous people in the United States. However, there has been scant research investment to develop strategies to address these inequities in Indigenous health. We present a case for increased health promotion, prevention, and treatment research with Indigenous populations. providing context to the recent NIH investment in the Intervention Research to Improve Native American Health (IRINAH) network. We discuss the disproportionate costs and consequences…

How Promising is the Vaccine News if People Won’t Take it? | Opinion

The last few weeks have brought a key tool in the fight against coronavirus: Moderna recently announced that a vaccine in Phase 3 trials was nearly 95 percent effective, exceeding even the most optimistic projections. Pfizer and BioNTech have also made similar announcements. But excitement about a forthcoming vaccine has been tempered by the reality that more and more Americans report having serious reservations about getting vaccinated. Alongside further vaccine…

Supporting Aging in Place Through IWISH: First Interim Report from the Supportive Services Demonstration

HUD’s Supportive Services Demonstration is a large, cluster randomized-controlled trial that leverages HUD-assisted properties as a platform for the coordination and delivery of services to better address the interdependent health and supportive service needs of its older residents. The demonstration tests the Integrated Wellness in Supportive Housing (IWISH) model, which funds a full-time Resident Wellness Director and part-time Wellness Nurse to work in HUD-assisted housing developments that either predominantly or…

Boston Construction Workers Are Vulnerable to Lead—and So Are Their Families

“Take-home” exposure is when dangerous contaminants come home on workers’ bodies and clothing, unintentionally exposing their families and causing issues including child lead poisoning. And lead dust from construction is a particularly dramatic take-home exposure here in the Boston area, according to a new study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Published in the journal Environmental Research, the…

Virtual Event: Gas Leaks, Energy Justice, and Community-Based Monitoring

Register here: https://www.northeastern.edu/environmentalhealth/virtual-event-registration-open-energy-justice-in-the-time-of-covid/ This conference will convene gas leak activists alongside lay and professional scientists for a discussion about how civic science fits into the push for a Just Transition. Civic science is ”a science that questions the state of things, rather than a science that simply serves the state” (Fortun & Fortun, 2005). In aging cities across New England, utilities leave hundreds of gas leaks unfixed. These leaks are…