Dr. Sara Wylie has received a prestigious fellowship

For the 2022-23 academic year, Associate Professor Sara Wylie and JPB E.H. from Cohort I will be serving as an Energy Justice Science, Technology and Policy Fellow in the new Office of Energy Justice Policy and Analysis at the Department of Energy. Dr. Wylie will be working on high-level strategies, policies, and research opportunities to execute the Justice40 Initiative across Department of Energy existing and new programs, particularly supporting 1) development of the environmental justice scores,…

Dr. Tony G. Reames Honored with National Council on Electricity Policy Brinch Award for Collaboration in Public Service

JPB Fellow Dr. Tony G. Reames, deputy director for energy justice at the U.S. Department of Energy, was awarded the Jan Brinch Award for Collaboration in Public Service by the National Council on Electricity Policy at its Annual Meeting on September 22. Reames received the award in recognition of his widely influential research into the intersections of affordability, access to clean energy resources and related disparities across race, class and…

‘A Multitude of Risks and Hazards’

UMD Expert: Jackson Water Crisis Latest Example of Marginalized Communities Bearing Brunt of Neglected Infrastructure For 40 days, residents of Jackson, Miss., had to boil water to brush their teeth, cook dinner or bathe after the city’s largest treatment plant failed. Schools in the state capital had to steer children away from unusable toilets or fountains, people lined up for 12 million bottles of donated water, and some hospitals had…

Community resilience to environmental hazards and climate change: can smart growth make a difference?

Over the last 20 years, principles of smart growth haven’t explicitly prioritized issues of community resilience in the context of climate change. Hence, literature exploring the integration of smart growth and community resilience, both mitigation and adaptation, is scant. In fact, early conceptualizations of smart growth did not even recognize resilience as a purported benefit or co-benefit. In this chapter, we explore the relationship between smart growth and climate change…

1A Remaking America: Wildfires are becoming more intense. Are communities ready?

Wildfires are a growing threat in the American West, with climate change making them more intense and more frequent. The risk worldwide of highly devastating fires could increase by up to 57 percent by the end of the century, according to a report from the UN Environment Programme. Boulder County, Colorado, is still recovering from the Marshall Fire last December. The blaze destroyed more than 1,000 homes and buildings. It was the most destructive wildfire…

New Article: Fisheries co-management in a digital age? An investigation of social media communications on the development of electronic monitoring for the Northeast U.S. groundfish fishery

Fisheries regulators have increasingly incorporated video monitoring systems, also known as electronic monitoring, into programs for fisheries data collection and documentation of bycatch. Electronic monitoring has recently emerged as one potential solution for fisheries monitoring and catch accounting in the Northeast United States, where fisheries regulators will soon require all commercial groundfish trips to be monitored either by electronic monitoring or human observers. Fisheries managers, scientists, and industry stakeholders have…

Presidential energy appointee works to ensure climate change initiatives are equitable, just, and fair

Recently appointed by President Joe Biden, Reames is “responsible for energy justice policy and analysis to ensure energy investments and benefits reach frontline communities and Black, Indigenous, and other communities of color.” Watch clips from JPB Fellow Tony’s interview here. On accepting the presidential appointment, Reames has taken a year’s leave of absence from his assistant professor duties at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS), though he’ll…

Mental health initiative connects UMD students with the outdoors

As the mental health of college students continues to be a concern in the United States, some academics believe that part of the solution lies in a simple, relatively inexpensive campus feature: nature. There is a growing body of research showing that time outdoors is good for you, with some studies showing that as little as 10 minutes is enough to have significant mental and physical health benefits. This research has spurred on a…

New Article: The Relationship of Historical Redlining with Present-Day Neighborhood Environmental and Health Outcomes: A Scoping Review and Conceptual Model

Following the Great Depression and related home foreclosures, the federal government established new agencies to facilitate access to affordable home mortgages, including the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) and Federal Housing Administration (FHA). HOLC and FHA directed widespread neighborhood appraisals to determine investment risk, referred to as “redlining,” which took into account residents’ race. Redlining thereby contributed to segregation, disinvestment, and racial inequities in opportunities for homeownership and wealth accumulation.…

Belcourt brings next generation to Native American Studies

Annie Belcourt has always been curious about her surroundings. It’s why she decided to enroll at the University of Montana for psychology in 1992. It’s why Belcourt transitioned from education to research after starting a post-doctoral position at the University of Colorado. And her drive for knowledge is part of why she is taking over as chair for the Native American Studies Department at UM this fall. With the leadership…